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MONDAY 01 FEBRUARY, 2010 | RSS Feed

Solarfun Joins Solar Panel Recycling Initiative

 

by Energy Matters

solarfun solar panels
Solar panels aren't exactly a throw-away item - a good quality panel should last at the very least 20 to 25 years. In fact, some panels commissioned in the 1970's are still generating clean electricity today.
  
But all good things must come to an end and when a solar panel does reach the end of its serviceable life - what do you do with it? In a couple of decades from now, what will become of the flood of solar panels that have been recently installed?
  
Some solar panel manufacturers are already looking ahead to this time. In 2007, an organisation called PV Cycle was started to implement the photovoltaic industry’s commitment to set up a voluntary take back and recycling scheme for retired panels and to take responsibility for solar modules throughout their entire value chain.
  
Solarfun, one of the world's largest manufacturers of panels for residential solar power applications, announced yesterday it had joined PV Cycle. Peter Xie, President of Solarfun, said the company is dedicated to finding new ways to make their solar panels even more environmentally friendly and the company looks forward to contributing to the development of new standards of sustainability. 
  
Other big names in the solar panel industry to have joined the group include Sanyo, Sharp and Suntech.
  
Solar panel materials can be recycled for use in new solar panels or various other products. Recyclable materials include silicon, glass and aluminium; which combined make up well over 90% of a solar panel's weight. While the energy that goes into making a solar panel is "paid back" within the first 18 months of its operation (on average), a solid recycling program for panels will make the photovoltaic industry even greener.
  
    

 

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