Obama Calls For More Solar To Help Battle Climate Change

obamaclimateactionplan

U.S President Barack Obama has put solar and other renewables in the spotlight as part of a plan to reduce the nation’s carbon emissions.
  
The President also expressed his growing impatience with lawmakers in denial over humanity’s role in climate change, stating “We don’t have time for a meeting of the Flat Earth Society.”
   
During the first term of Obama’s Presidency, the United States more than doubled generation of electricity from wind, solar, and geothermal sources. Under The President’s Climate Action Plan (PDF), a goal has been set to double renewable electricity generation once again by 2020.
  
Under the Plan, all Federal buildings would be required to source 20% of their electricity supply from renewables from 2020.
  
The U.S. will also work with trading partners to launch negotiations at the World Trade Organization towards global free trade in environmental goods, including renewable energy equipment.
  
Rhone Resch, president and CEO of the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA), called the Plan a “watershed moment” in the nation’s history and applauded Obama’s understanding of the threats posed by climate change.
   
“We commend him for offering a bold, decisive plan to combat climate change and to mitigate the impacts of carbon pollution. But this isn’t just the President’s legacy at stake – it’s also ours. Let’s not be remembered as the generation of Americans that could have made a difference, but didn’t.”
  
The news is particularly heartening to the nation’s solar industry as the Plan will ensure expansion, more jobs and more research and development; to the benefit of all.
  
“This is our moment in time. America’s solar energy industry stands ready to do our part to help fight climate change and usher in a new era of clean energy in America and around the world. Despite what some critics say, this isn’t a choice between clean energy and a robust economy. We can have both, and solar is showing how to make that possible,” said Mr. Resch.