Energy Matters Video News – Episode 43 – August 24, 2011

Presented by Energy Matters team member Virginia, we take a look at some of the stories from Australia and around the world recently added to our renewable energy news section.
           
In this episode, Virginia covers looming changes to South Australia’s solar feed in tariff, Watarrka National Park’s solar diesel hybrid power system,  a survey reveals the depth of NSW’s solar industry crisis and Australia’s only solar panel factory to stop producing solar cells.  

 

       
In this episode:
               
– South Australia’s feed in tariff rate has just over 5 weeks before it will be dramatically slashed for new applications. The current rate will be dropped from 44 cents to 22 cents for new solar connections after September. The new rate will be roughly equivalent to current retail electricity costs, so in effect a one-to-one feed in tariff. Energy Matters is offering a series of solar power specials to help South Australians join the thousands of others who are generating their own electricity with systems supplied and installed by the company.  Read more.
     
– A recent survey of 91 solar businesses in New South Wales has shown 25% have closed or will close their doors in the next month. The closures are being blamed on the NSW government’s handling of the state’s Solar Bonus Scheme. Despite the shocking situation in the state, Energy Matters’ CEO Jeremy Rich says that with NSW electricity costs rising by a staggering 17 per cent in July, solar is still a very worthwhile investment. Read more.
     
– Northern Territory Parks and Wildlife Minister Karl Hampton recently announced the completed installation of a new hybrid solar system in Watarrka National Park. The system was constructed to reduce fossil fuel consumption at the park’s ranger station.  Read more.
     
– Silex Solar has recently announced that the company will no longer manufacture solar cells at its Sydney Olympic Park plant. This will result in approximately 30 redundancies. Read more.