Energy Matters Video News – Episode 63 – April 4, 2012

Presented by Energy Matters team member Virginia, we take a look at some of the stories from Australia and around the world recently added to our renewable energy news section.
                 
This week, Virginia reports on price wars in Australia’s solar sector, Energy Matters becoming Australia’s first accredited REC solar professional, greening solar panel production and Victorian coal fired power stations receiving hundreds of millions of dollars in carbon tax ‘compensation’.

 

       
In this episode:
  
  
Sometimes consumers aren’t the winners in price wars. A number of Australian solar retailers have folded over the last 12 months, impacting jobs and customers who have paid deposits or require service on an existing system. Read more.
  
Energy Matters is the first Australian company to be awarded accreditation under solar panel manufacturer REC’s new certification program. REC’s program includes warranty extension for modules installed by suitably qualified REC Solar Professionals. Each qualifying installer can now offer extra 2 years warranty to consumers purchasing REC solar panels. Read more.
  
A new report by non-profit group As You Sow has uncovered the best practices of the top 100 PV Manufacturing companies from around the world.
Some manufacturers have made great progress to green their solar panel production, including Norway’s REC. REC solar panels have an energy payback time of one year due to the company’s fluidised bed reactor silicon production process that uses up to 90% less energy than traditional methods. Read more.
 
As compensation for the carbon tax, six Victorian coal fired power stations will receive $1 billion dollars of Federal Government funding. Hazelwood Power Station will receive approximately $266 million this year. The station burns brown coal, a highly emissive intensive form of fossil fuel and spews around 16 million tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere each year. This single station is thought to account for around 3 per cent of Australia’s total green house gas output. Read more.